Welcome to eHealth Network for Africa

Create an account today to see more

Good Morning
  • Articles (2,326)
  • GIS software helps optimise health efforts

    Graphic information systems (GIS) software could change the way countries tackle public healthcare issues. GIS helps capture, store, combine, analyse and display aggregated data from censuses and national health information systems and then overlays this data onto regional maps.  This visual representation of data then allows departments of health and ministries to better manage resources and plan accordingly. 

    A great advantage of using GIS technology in healthcare application is the spatial dependency of health related factors.  Several countries and organisations have already started to invest in GIS programmes.  In the United States, the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) launched its 500 Cities Project, which aims to provide geographic data on the distribution of chronic disease risk factors.  In South Africa, the South African National Aids Council (SANAC) launched the Focus for Impact Project, which aims to identify populations most at risk in areas most severely affected by HIV and TB. 

    The hope is that by better visualising and understanding the geographic distribution of health variables, health departments and planners will be able to plan public health interventions more effectively.  GIS software helps with this by answering 2 key questions; 

    Where are the high burden areas? – by overlaying routine health data on geographical regionsWhy is it a high burden area? – by profiling epidemiology and associated risks using secondary data and community dialogue 

    This in turn allows health departments and health planners to identify; 

    Who is at risk in this high burden area?What interventions can help reduce this burden? 

    To improve the overall health of our communities, access to these kinds of services is vital.  Further investment into GIS programmes could reveal other beneficial use cases for the healthcare industry, improve overall efficiency and better manage the cost burden of the healthcare system.

  • Malawi uses eCCM app to combat child mortality

    In Malawi, Health Surveillance Assistant’s (HSA’s) serve as a link between the the local community and the national healthcare system.  They make use of the WHO and UNICEF community case management (CCM) clinical decision tool to identify those requiring urgent referral to hospitals and those who can be treated at the local points-of-care before going back home.  The Supporting LIFE project has created an mhealth app that replicates this CCM tool to ease decision-making and workload for HSA’s.  

    The app supports a similar workflow to the paper-based CCM tool, allowing the HSA to enter patient information on an easy to use touch-screen interface.  It’s developed for the Android platform and is functional in an offline environment, making it ideal for countries like Malawi, where internet connectivity is a problem.  Power was also an issue during the Malawi pilot, so HSA’s were also provided with mini solar powered chargers for their devices. 

    During the pilot 3 indicators were measured to assess the potential impact of the app;

    Improvement in the number of children correctly referred to a health facility as a result of using the app.Increased attendance rates, as a result of correct referrals made by HAS’s using the app; andDecreased re-consultation rates through correct diagnosis and referral from the app

    The results of the pilot were presented at an mHealth strategy workshop and provided the health ministry and key policy makers with valuable data to improve the health systems in Malawi.  HSA’s using the app reported mostly positive responses.  

    While such projects offer great community benefits and health system improvements, further assessment is needed around the feasibility of scaling nationally, as well as integration with core systems like the DHIS2.

  • Low-cost video laryngoscope developed in South Africa

    “Innovation is change that unlocks new value” - Jamie Notter. This is what Cape Town Anaesthesiologist, Dr Caroline Corbett, is doing with her video laryngoscope invention.  SmartBlade, is a cost effective, novel and real-world solution to the management of a difficult airway. 

    It uses forward-thinking smartphone technology to link with video laryngoscopy, thus allowing clinicians to easily intubate difficult airways. The clinician can suction a soiled airway or perform apnoeic oxygenation, both without interrupting attempts to intubate. 

    The customised mobile application also facilitates video conferencing, image capture, recording and secure data storage.  SmartBlade aims to become a standard of care in advanced airway management. 

    This novel device won the WFSA-Fresenius Kabi Anaesthesia Innovation Award in 2017.  The South African Society of Anaesthesiologists (SASA) is proud of this accolade and looks forward to seeing it being used in South African hospitals in the future.

  • Zambia hosts ICT4D 10th annual conference

     Innovate. Connect. Transform. This is what executives, senior managers, program leaders, field officers, IT/data managers, and senior technical advisors will be doing in Lusaka, Zambia from the 8th-10th of May. 

    This year’s ICT4D’s conference will gather these cadres to discuss and debate solutions and answers to questions such as how and where ICT innovation helps sectors in aid and development achieve goals and accelerate their objectives. 

    Their exciting programme, with 6 parallel tracks including Agriculture, Health, Livelihoods & Education, Humanitarian Response, Digital Financial Inclusion, and Collaboration & Openness in ICT4D, is now available on the site.  Post conference activities offer participants interactive sessions to understand how to get more out of ICT4D tools such as CommCare or DHIS 2. 

    This is a great opportunity for Africa’s health care innovators to share their innovations, but more importantly learn from other industries to approach health care challenges more innovatively.  To secure your place, register via the conference website.

  • Bio-artificial kidney to become an alternate solution for renal dialysis

    Being on dialysis may give a patient with renal failure a chance to live a longer life. However, there are frequent inherent risks associated with it. The kidney project seeks to address this in an innovative way.

    According to the national kidney foundation, over 100 000 patients are currently waiting for a donor kidney and over 3000 are added to the list yearly. An average patient may spend 3-4 years waiting for a transplant and may be on dialysis whilst they wait. However, studies have found that only one in three patients may survive the 3-4 years without receiving the transplant.

    The kidney project’s goal is to implant a bio-artificial kidney to give hope beyond the short term solution of dialysis.  It can do this by simulating the removal of waste products, salt and water as a normal kidney would. Nanotechnology microchips are the key behind the the artificial kidney.

    While transplanted organs need to be thoroughly screened to prevent tissue rejection, the artificial solution bypasses such complications. The foundation hopes to begin human trials with the implanted kidney in 2018.

  • GE sells its healthcare Value-Based Care Division to Veritas for >$1b

    In a shake-up to the health ICT supply side, an announcement by GE says it’s selling its:

    Enterprise Financial Management, Revenue-Cycle, Centricity BusinessAmbulatory Care Management, Centricity Practice SolutionWorkforce Management, formerly API Healthcare.

    The buyer, Veritas Capital takes it on for $1.05b in a cash-will-do-nicely deal. It’s Veritas Capital is a leading, global private equity firm that invests in companies that provide essential products and services. Technology and technology-enabled solutions are its main service range. Governments and commercial organisations are its main customers.

    They extend across aerospace, defence, healthcare, national security, communications, energy, education and government services. It’s Veritas business model seeks to create value by strategically transforming companies that it invests in.

    GE says Veritas is ideal to provide the focus and investment needed to take GE’s former services to the next level of scale and performance. The former GE team  sees the switch as an opportunity to revitalise its product portfolio and pursue complementary acquisitions. The intended result’s better for patients, providers and payers services

    These big outfits seldom see Africa’s health systems as fruitful markets. Affordability’s a constraint. Will Veritas take a different view?

  • AI is also attractive for cyber-criminals

    As healthcare increases investment on eHealth projects and services, there should be synchronous investment in security measures.  In 2017, 25% of all data breaches were related to the healthcare industry.  This is because cyber-criminals have been working to make their attacks more advanced to easily target connected devices, cloud, and multi-cloud environments.  These advanced cyber-attacks are even able to evade detection by most legacy security solutions in place. 

    Advancements are aided by adopting AI and machine learning to carry out complex attacks at a rapid pace. Botnets such as Reaper have been made more sophisticated, enabling them to target multiple vulnerabilities at once.  Others, such as polymorphic malware allows for hundreds of variations of a threat to be created for different purposes in a matter of hours. 

    To address these challenges, Fortinet has recently released a few product enhancements that will tip the scales back in the favour of the healthcare industry;

    Fort iOS 6.0 – provides an integrated security architecture that spans the distributed networkFortiGuard AI – is an AI solution that is able to address automated attacksThreat Intelligence Services (TIS) - provides visibility into network activity and metrics to give healthcare security teams an understanding of their threat landscape 

    It has become inexpensive for criminals to mount attacks on healthcare data, but increasingly expensive for their targets. One key to the healthcare security transformation is flipping this paradigm.

  • Computer aided detection for TB (CAD4TB) installed across Ghana

    A target of sustainable development goals (SDGs) is to end tuberculosis (TB) globally by 2030.  Effective prevention, detection and treatment is necessary to achieve this goal.  Ghana is in the global high burden list for TB, but is tackling this burden using eHealth innovations. 

    In collaboration with Delft Imaging Systems, they have successfully installed 51 X-ray systems in facilities, containers and TB screening mobile clinics across the country.  These mobile X-ray systems are self sustainable, employing solar technology to power them, even in the remotest of locations.  All X-ray systems have been equipped with computer aided detection (CAD4TB) software that makes use of machine learning to detect TB in X-rays.  Additionally, tele-radiology technology is used to interlink all images to a central platform that allows healthcare providers across connected facilities and units to access images.

    The innovation allows healthcare providers to screen up to 200 images per day.  When the images reveal a high CAD4TB score, patients are referred for the standard and more expensive GeneExpert tests.  This makes detecting TB in poorer communities very effective. 

    It is eHealth innovations like this that will strengthen health systems in Ghana and other African countries, while still being conservative of the constrained health budgets in Africa.

  • Future health data systems need more of these

    On March 14th I spoke at the ANOVA data summit in Johannesburg. I was asked to talk about the future of health data and its systems. Earlier that morning Stephen Hawking had passed away leaving the scientific community weighing the enormity of one man’s extraordinary contribution. Some of his famous words repeated in my mind, including his terse challenge, “The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge”, an apt warning for those of us in the information space.

    As health systems decisions become more data driven, demands for enough, quality data, and ways to make sense of it, increase too. Expectations are high.

    “It has become increasingly clear that Universal Health Coverage cannot be achieved without the support of eHealth” WHO suggested in the third global survey on eHealth and AMIA proposes that “access to broadband is, or soon will become, a social determinant of health”.

    In African countries, competition for resources is fuelled by smaller budgets trying to address substantial service gaps. Decisions to invest in eHealth and data need to be taken with considerable care, and must be economically sound, affordable, and evidence-based.

    Data systems should be built in steps that are sustainable and yield information that can be trusted. Emphasis should be on integration and consolidation and embracing emerging opportunities. It needs sound strategic planning too, with emphasis on:

    More substantive partnering among stakeholders Better agreement on architectural frameworks and evolving standardsMore opportunities for data collection from individuals, through mobile phones and other devices that become ubiquitousExploring new approaches to unique identifiers, including understanding the potential role of a medical blockchainIncorporating AI and machine learning to augment progress.

    Alongside these, cyber-security requires constant vigilance.

    Acfee is building a toolkit of good practice for help knowledge workers navigate these issues and make good choices.

    Talking about the future is fun but too often gratuitous. Hawking pointed out that “Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change”. The ability of our health data to provide value is also about our ability to adapt to health’s changing needs, to ensure that our efforts remain relevant and support impact.

    ---------------------------

    Sean is CTO at HISP-SA and Chairperson of Acfee. HISP-SA supports the South African Department of Health in its efforts to build information systems that support health transformation.

    Acfee advances eHealth’s health strengthening and transformation role for Africa through the eHealth Network for Africa blog and eHealthAFRO stakeholder platforms, engagement with African Ministries of Health and other regional eHealth leadership groups, and the collection and sharing of knowledge and tools.

  • Data accuracy: another use case for blockchain

    As blockchain technology continues to excite the healthcare industry with opportunities for better access to healthcare data, data security and efficiency, 5 companies have banded together to explore another use case for it. 

    Many managed care organisations, health systems, physicians, and other healthcare stakeholders currently maintain separate copies of healthcare provider data.  Reconciling differences in this data can be a time-consuming and expensive processes.  Blockchain could help bring down administrative costs by ensuring data is complete and accurate across all parties.

    Humana, MultiPlan, Optum, Quest Diagnostics and UnitedHealthcare recently announced a cooperative pilot program to use blockchain technology to share healthcare provider data across organisations.  This aims to improve accuracy, streamline administrative activities and improve access to care. It will also examine whether sharing healthcare provider data inputs and changes made by parties across a blockchain can reduce operational costs and improve data quality. 

    With technology's rapid advances, it's critical that African countries make room for these types of emerging opportunities in their eHealth strategies. Along with rigorous prospective assessments to ensure viability and sustainability.

  • AlienVault insider’s guide to cyber-security incident response can help

    Preventing cyber-security breaches is a top priority. On its own, it’s not enough. Cyber-criminals are at least one step ahead, so sound preparation for an incident response’s vital.  A book from Alien Vault can help. It's an Insider’s Guide to Incident Response in one eBook! 

    It provides a detailed insight into the fundamental strategies of efficient and effective incident response that security teams need. The goal should be to do more with less to deal with the rapidly changing cyber-threats. The guide deals with: 

    Arming and aiming an incident response teamIncident response processes and proceduresTypes of cyber-security incidentsIncident response toolsIncident response training

    Combating cyber-threats needs teams with a strong mental constitution.  Techniques are needed too. The guide sets out how to build an incident response plan and develop a team that has the right tools and training.

    Observe, Orient, Decide and Act (OODA) loop’s the core methodology.  It’s a cycle developed by military strategist and United States Air Force Colonel John Boyd. He used it to help to prepare for combat operations processes. It’s now applied to understand commercial activities. 

    Benjamin Franklin, the 18th century polymath promoted the original concept. “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” It applies to eHealth too.

  • e-Hospital portals can improve hospitals

    The world we live in has seen a revolution of digitisation in mobile phones, banks and the internet are examples.  People want to avoid or reduce the time they spend doing things manually, and would rather opt for using the latest technology.

    An e-Hospital portal is an example. It’s a project introduced by the government of India. An aim's to use technology to empower people and help them connect to areas of health.

    e-Hospital enables the public to book outpatient appointments, view diagnostic reports, check the availability of blood, lab reports and pay their fees. Using this type of eHealth offers quicker access, remote diagnosis and faster medical prescriptions. Time taken to receive treatment or see a medical expert is expected to be reduced considerably.

    Services provided by an e-Hospital portal maximises the contribution of existing healthcare professionals. It enables networks of nurses and doctors to achieve more efficient treatment and monitoring.

    The large scale of the project offers an insight for Africa’s eHealth strategies. Planning directly for national coverage can offer bigger scale benefits, even where, as in India, roll out's phased.

  • mPowering frontline health workers’ launches WASH health domain on ORB

    Exhortations to people to wash their hands frequently have a long history. Continuous, accessible reminders are still essential.  Handwashing’s the single most cost-effective intervention to prevent pneumonia and diarrhoea in children. It reduces infections during pregnancy and childbirth too.

    In the eHealth age, there are more sophisticated ways of disseminating the advice than numerous signs with lots of slogans. mPowering Frontline Health Workers is launching a new domain using on Object Request Broker (ORB) for Water, Sanitations and Hygiene (WASH). It contains training materials for health workers. ORB’s middleware that allows program calls from one computer to another. It relies on a computer networks.

    The need’s clear. In 2013, WHO and The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH)  identified the challenge of diarrhoea. Diarrhoeal disease is the second leading cause of death and a leading cause of malnutrition in children under five. It’s in children under five years old

     years old. It is both preventable and treatable. There’s an estimated 1.7 billion cases of diarrhoeal disease every year, leading to about 760,000 children under five dying. A significant proportion of diarrhoeal disease can be prevented through safe drinking-water and adequate sanitation and hygiene.

    Another report says an estimated 10-15% of maternal deaths are due to two causes. One’s infections linked to unhygienic conditions during labour. The other’s poor hygiene practices during six weeks after birth. 

    ORB’s WASH materials provide training and information on waste management, urban water supplies, sanitation planning, environmental health. All content’s quality assured to ensure accuracy and relevance for health workers. It’s accessible from mobile devices. 

    mPowering Frontline Health Workers is an initiative of USAID and the mHealth Alliance. It has six goals:

    Crowdsource innovative multi?media health contentCreate an online library of downloadable digital health content for organisations in developing countriesProduce a digital dictionary to enable integration and standardised reporting across several mHealth applicationsAccelerate the sustainable expansion of mHealth for frontline health workers in more than three developing countriesRigorously evaluate partnership impactShare experiences through a virtual global learning platform. 

    An estimate of 42% of global deaths from diarrhoea of children under five are in Africa. That’s about 320,000 children. mPowering Frontline Health Workers has an essential role.

  • Philips introduces AI tools for healthcare efficiency

    HIMSS Conference and Exhibition is synonymous for sharing new innovations and showcasing next world technology.  At HIMMS18 in Las Vegas, Phillips announced the launch of a new set of tools that supports the progressive adoption of analytics and artificial intelligence (AI) in key healthcare domains.

    Their HealthSuite Insights gives data scientists, software developers, clinicians and healthcare providers access to advanced analytic resources to compile and analyse healthcare data.  It also offers tools and technologies to build, maintain, deploy and scale AI-based solutions. 

    AI-based solutions have great potential to improve patient outcomes and healthcare efficiency. However, developing and deploying AI solutions for healthcare use cases can be time consuming, resource intensive and expensive.  Philips’ Insights Marketplace can help with this.  The Insights Marketplace will provide the healthcare industry’s first ecosystem where curated AI assets from Philips and others are readily available for license. 

    Philip’s HealthSuite Insights and Insights Marketplace may help accelerate Africa’s eHealth development. African countries are increasingly aware of the necessity of technology in improving the performance of healthcare.  Some parts of Africa have already started integrating artificial intelligence in their healthcare systems.

  • Facebook’s using AI to prevent suicides

    According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), a suicide occurs every 40 seconds globally.  Social, psychological, cultural and other factors can interact to lead a person to suicidal behavior.  Facebook believes that they are uniquely positioned to help combat suicides amongst adolescents and its users.

    They’re using AI and smart algorithms to detect suicidal tendencies and patterns.  The AI software scans users’ messages and posts for signs of suicide, such as asking someone if they are troubled.  Facebook already has tools in place for people to report concerns about friend's who may be considering self-harm, but the new AI software can speed the process and even detect signs people may overlook. 

    Posts that are flagged as worrisome are communicated to first-responders.  It’s also dedicating more human moderators to suicide prevention, training them to deal with the cases 24/7. They have partnered with organisations like Save.org, National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and Forefront from to provide resources to at-risk users and their networks. 

    Ubiquitous technologies often come with unrealised responsibilities.  Facebook’s demonstrating they're willing to take on these responsibilities and use their platform for greater social and health benefits.

  • Apple health app stores personal medical information

    Giving patients access to their medical records is an increasing priority. It can help them to manage their conditions and comply with medication and treatment requirements

    Apple is determined to make people’s lives easier. It’s created a new app that people can use on their iPhones to access, view and store their medical records on their person. Data on the app includes; allergies, test results, prescription drug list, immunization records or general health histories. Patients can also add files to the menu, provided they comply with Clinical Documented Architecture (CDA).

    Medical records information’s transmitted electronically from participating providers to patients’ iPhones. It needs patients to opt into the service via the health app and be able to browse through their data as well as receive new notifications when updated.  

    Jeff Williams, Apple’s chief Operating Officer (COO), assures that the app’s data is password protected an encrypted. It even denies Apple access to the information unless it is shared by patients.

    An announcement by Apple says patients with multiple chronic conditions will probably have considerable benefit.

    There’s a tricky bit about portals and patients accessing their medical records. A study reported on eHNA found for some patients, access made no difference to their health outcomes compared to patients who didn’t have access.

  • Will robots be cooking on gas in hospital kitchens?

    Inpatients need nutritious meals as part of their care plans. This puts hospital catering services as an important part of healthcare teams. While robots in clinical activity have received considerable attention, their opportunities in hospital catering hasn’t. Flippy might change that.

    A report  in Tech Crunch says Miso Robotics is rolling out a robotic kitchen assistant. It’s called Flippy. It’s first job’s flipping burgers. Already, it’s a bit of a celebrity, with a YouTube and Vimeo performances. 

    While burgers may not be the ideal meal for inpatients, Cali Burger makes and sells burgers in twelve countries and found Flippy its first job. It doesn’t look like a chef.

    It’s a small, wheeled cart with a six-axis robotic arm and  a sensor bar. It takes data from thermal sensors, 3D sensors and several cameras to assess its environment. Digital systems send tickets from the counter to the kitchen as Flippy’s orders.

    Then, it picks up unwrapped burgers, puts onto a hot grill, tracks their cooking time and temperature, then alerts chefs when to apply cheese or other toppings. When that’s done, Flippy plates the burgers.

     but doesn’t wrap them or add finishing touches like lettuce, tomatoes, avocado or a restaurant’s signature sauce.

    Momentum Machines makes kitchen robots too. Flippy’s different. It relies on  AI software and machine learning, so it learns to make new foods, adapting to a restaurant’s seasonal menu changes. This might be the potential for Flippy’s descendants to take on more sophisticated jobs in hospital kitchens. Let’s hope they’re not wayward offspring called Floppy.

  • An HIV-free future: improving adherence to antiretroviral treatment

    It is common knowledge that HIV and AIDS has long been an overwhelming challenge in Africa. East and sub-Saharan Africa is the most affected region in the world.  Statistics indicate that at least 19.4 million people are living with HIV in this part of the continent. South Africa alone has the biggest HIV epidemic in the world with 7.1 million people living with HIV.  In 2016, there were at least 270 000 new infections and 110 000 AIDS-related deaths in the country.

    These statistics are worrying, but there is hope. It is estimated that 61% of adults and 51% of children in East and Southern Africa are on anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Antiretroviral medications (ARVs) are life-saving drugs that have turned HIV into a manageable chronic condition. The disease is no longer a death-sentence and when HIV-positive people take their ARVs responsibly and strictly.

    Adherence to ART is often an overlooked issue despite its incredible importance. In order for an HIV-positive person to achieve an effective level of viral suppression, adherence to ARVs needs to be more than 95%. This means that there is very little room for those living with HIV to skip their ARVs.

    Remembering when to take medication on time can be challenging for many reasons. People use different methods to remind themselves, but in most cases, these methods are not always reliable or effective.

    MyTherapy, a medication reminder and health tracker app designed in Germany, is an effective and easy-to-use app that has been proven to raise adherence levels significantly. In a short space of time, the app has improved adherence by over 45% and currently has over 500,000 users.

    While the app’s main function is to help its users keep track of their medication intake, it has also been designed to improve their overall health and sense of wellbeing. Users can record important measurements, like blood pressure and weight, and track their symptoms, and for those living with HIV, the app allows users to enter lab-results data, such as blood tests, kidney-function tests and viral load.

    The app is easy-to-use and all users have to do is enter the relevant data and set alarm times. The app is designed to handle complex medication regimens, perfect for ART which requires multiple medication intake per day, and all recorded data can be printed out at the end of each month in easy-to-read graphs, which is useful for the user’s doctor. Furthermore, while the app does rely on self-efficacy and self-discipline, users can invite family and friends on the app to help them stick to their treatment plans, ensuring that various parties are involved to promote adherence further. MyTherapy also takes data protection and privacy seriously, and users also have the option to use a passcode to prevent others from accessing the app and seeing personal data.

    ARVs are exceptional drugs that have changed the face of HIV and AIDS forever.  There is potential for an HIV-free future, only if those living with the virus are responsible and take their ART strictly.

    Knowledge of HIV/AIDS is continuously expanding. Information in the article's taken from Avert and the NCBI. 

  • An analytical view of Blockchain aids understanding

    Paradigm shifts are regularly sought after by information and ICT initiatives. As a set of ideas, assumptions, and values that can help to live and see the world, a paradigm doesn’t seem easy to shift. In The Business Blockchain, published by Wiley, William Mougayar describes how Blockchain’s a paradigm shift. 

    It’s part of a sequence of paradigm shifts of the Internet, the World Wide Web, and now Blockchain. He’s firm that Blockchain’s different to all that’s originated before. It’s also tricky to understand, with a clear grasp of its philosophy essential to comprehend its technical components.

    Blockchain has six enablers, programmable: 

    AssetsTrustOwnershipMoneyIdentityContracts.

    Creating ATOMIC, Mougayar delves well into each of these. This delving and diving’s a characteristic of the book. It’s the knowledge and insights that these provide ensure it’s not a superficial overview or description. Examples are the explanation of the set of basic principles and the emphasis on Blockchain’s decentralisation features.

    Wynton Marsalis, the jazz trumpeter said to understand art, you must come to art. Art will not come to you. This resonates with Blockchain. Mougayar’s book’s essential to begin the journey. Africa’s health systems need to follow the tricky route to ensure strategic opportunities are not lost. 

  • Need a Big Data and AI overview; this’s it

    It seems that Big Data isn’t big after all. David Stephenson, in his book Big Data Demystified, published by Pearson, says “Big” significantly understates the volume and differences to conventional data. Understanding it needs to be in its context of AI and Machine Learning (ML). 

    He ranges over Big Data’s:

    UsefulnessEcosystemStrategyImplementationTechnology selectionTeam buildingGovernance and legal compliance.

    Case studies bring each of these into practical environments. While Stephenson’s keen on Big Data, his book’s not an exhortation to rush into initiatives. Instead, his “Keep in mind” boxes are valuable switches from his commentary that provide realistic insights for policy makers, strategists, executives, managers, practitioners, health workers and students.

    It’s clearly written and offers new, late and in between comers to Big Data many very valuable insights and case studies. Examples are his analyses of Big Data’ infrastructure requirements and its 3Vs, Volume, Velocity and Variety. His concept of a “data lake” draws a vivid perspective of Big Data’s difference to databases 

    He includes a salutary lesson. Many Big Data projects “Die on the launch pad because of inadequate preparation, internal resistance or poor programme management.” His case study was a $62m crash.

    As Africa’s health systems move towards more Big Data opportunities, Big Data Demystified will help to set scenarios that lie ahead. Investment in new skills is part of it.